Population ecology of the Barbary Macaque (Macaca sylvanus) in the fir forests of the Ghomara, Moroccan Rif Mountains.
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Population ecology of the Barbary Macaque (Macaca sylvanus) in the fir forests of the Ghomara, Moroccan Rif Mountains.

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Published .
Written in English


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Pagination2v.
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Open LibraryOL20084045M

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From inside the book. What people are saying - Write a review. We haven't found any reviews in the usual places. Contents. The Barbary Macaque. 3: The Demise of Barbary Macaque Habitat. Bou Jirrir breeding captive group cedar forest Chap cliffs climate conservation cork oak Deag density distribution Djebel Djurdjura Ecology. The principal aim of this book is to present a synthesis of current knowledge of the biology of the Barbary macaque, and in doing so to recognise the contribution the Barbary has made to our understanding of primate socio-biology. Importantly, the book also looks at the species from a comparative perspective within the macaque genus as a whole. The Barbary macaque (all too often mistakenly called an ape) was first brought to the attention of the Conservation Working Party of the Primate Society of Great Britain late when John Fa reported that 'surplus' animals were being sent from Gibraltar to Brand: Springer US. A separate, and introduced, population of Barbary macaques resides in the British Overseas Territory of Gibraltar, giving this Old World Monkey the distinction of being the only native species of primate to occur in Europe, the only macaque to live outside of Asia, and the only surviving nonhuman primate in Africa north of the Sahara Desert.

The name Barbary refers to the Berber People of Morocco who since the beginning of history had ties with the animals surrounding their region, as the Barbary macaques. The macaque population had also been present on the Rock of Gibraltar long before Gibraltar was captured by the British in and according to records, since prior to reconquest of Gibraltar from the Muslims. Population management and viability of the Gibraltar Barbary Macaques J. E. Fa and R. Lind; Eco-ethology of Tibetan Macaques at Mt. Emei, China Q. Zhao; Part III. Mating and Social Systems: Differential reproduction in male and female Price: $ Description. Aside from humans (genus Homo), the macaques are the most widespread primate genus, ranging from Japan to the Indian subcontinent, and in the case of the barbary macaque (Macaca sylvanus), to North Africa and Southern -three macaque species are currently recognized, all of which are Asian except for the Barbary Macaque; including some of Class: Mammalia.   The Barbary macaque (all too often mistakenly called an ape) was first brought to the attention of the Conservation Working Party of the Primate Society of Great Britain late when John Fa reported that 'surplus' animals were being sent from Gibraltar to dubious locations, such as an Italian safari park. Since there had been no scientific input into the Army's .

  Over a 9-year period from to ecological and demographic data were collected on two genetic isolates of Barbary macaques (Macaca sylvanus) in Algeria, from the deciduous oak-forest of Akfadou and from the evergreen cedar-oak forest of the National Park Djurdjura. Macaques at Djurdjura profit from more suitable ecological conditions and have a Cited by: The Feeding Ecology of the Barbary Macaque and Cedar Forest Conservation in the Moroccan Moyen Atlas.- 7. Aspects of the Ecology and Conservation of the Barbary Macaque in the Fir Forest Habitat of the Moroccan Rif Mountains In this book, world authorities on macaques interpret recent research and present up-to-date syntheses of many aspects of macaque ecology, evolution, behaviour and conservation. This book will prove to be the definitive synthesis of the subject for all those interested in this fascinating group of monkeys for many years to Range: £ - £   More pertinently, macaques also vary in the extent to which they show adaptive or maladaptive responses to human disturbance and anthropogenic landscapes, i.e., along a spectrum of overlap at human-macaque interfaces (Priston and McLennan ; Radhakrishna and Sinha ; Radhakrishna et al. ).At the upper end of this spectrum lie rhesus and Author: Krishna N. Balasubramaniam, Cédric Sueur, Michael A. Huffman, Andrew J. J. MacIntosh.